Tag: elementary

Local Leaders Get Hands-on With Coding

Elementary campuses in Seguin this week have had several visitors attend technology classes to participate in Hour of Code activities. We have been privileged and excited to host current  and former school board members, a city councilperson, the president of our local chamber of commerce, the mayor of Seguin, and our county judge. Our guests tried their hands at a variety of coding tools, including Code.org, CodeMonkey, Lightbot, and CodeCombat, were introduced to the campuses’ 3D printing and design programs, and got a first-hand look at some of the ways the district is trying to give students a wide range of computer science experiences.

Block coding tools like Code.org have been used to intruduce basic concepts.

Block coding tools like Code.org have been used to intruduce basic concepts.

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City Councilwoman Fonda Mathis joined Jenifer Wells’ students at Rodriguez Elementary.

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Trusty Cindy Thomas-Jimenez received pointers from a Rodriguez Elementary coding pro.

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Trustee Ben Amador observes student coders using CodeMonkey at Patlan Elementary.

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20 levels of CodeMonkey have been added to Learning.com resources this school year.

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Code.org resources include educational videos, such as this one featuring one of the founders of the videogame Minecraft.

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Seguin mayor Don Keil joined students at Patlan Elementary for his second Hour of Code.

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Patlan Elementary students are excited about learning about coding!

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Mayor Keil and team work through a particularly challenging task.

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Seguin Councilwoman Fonda Mathis brought her computer science background to Rodriguez Elementary.

Trustee Amador also paid a visit to Mrs. Casiano's lab at Koennecke Elementary, where students were learning Python code using CodeCombat.

Trustee Amador also paid a visit to Mrs. Casiano’s lab at Koennecke Elementary, where students were learning Python code using CodeCombat.

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Trustee Cinde Thomas-Jimenez joined Rodriguez Elementary students in an Hour of Code.

3D in Elementary: Our First Steps

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Img Source: http://tinyurl.com/hybzpt6

This fall, we are undertaking several improvements to our technology offerings. Elementary schools are all getting Dremel Idea Builder 3D printers. Middle Schools are getting courses in robotics. All K-8 tech apps courses are being updated to include a greater emphasis on coding, multimedia production, and 3D design. The aim is to make our offerings more current and engaging to our kids by taking them out of the keyboarding-and-Powerpoint routine.

The 3D design and printing aspects of the program are a work in progress, and we will be practicing what we preach by taking some risks, making mistakes, and learning from those mistakes. For the present time, we are only planning on piloting 3rd thru 5th grades. Here are the basic goals:

  • Foster creativity and innovation.
  • Develop problem-solving and critical thinking skills.
  • Develop visual/spatial reasoning.
  • Apply geometry and math concepts to authentic tasks.
  • Support core subject area curriculum whenever possible

Campus technology staff received their first round of training in September. I chose to train them on Autodesk’s Tinkercad for the design tool and Project Ignite  for the curriculum and introductory activities. Both are free and share 1 account per student. Accounts can easily be created by the teacher through the Project Ignite dashboard and require no student emails.  Project Ignite allows teachers to assign projects and enables them to monitor student progress. Students learn to use Tinkercad as they are taken step by step through the

Dremel's snowflake design tool.

Dremel’s snowflake design tool.

assigned projects within Tinkercad’s actual work interface. Dremel also has a few very easy, browser-based projects students can personalize and complete in just a few minutes, albeit without a lot of the real design benefits of the Tinkercad projects. Once a student has finished a project that will be printed, they simply save the .stl file to their Google Drive and share it with their teacher or save on a USB drive to move to the printing computer.

Here are a few of the starter projects our students may be taking on this semester to get their feet wet:

  • Fall symbols (leaves, pumpkins, ghosts, etc.)
  • Things for which they are thankful. These might be made into charms for rubberband bracelets or necklaces.
  • Personalized dog tags
  • Holiday ornaments
  • Election badges/get out the vote buttons
  • Pencil toppers
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5th grade 3D projects at RodrigueZ ES

For the time being, our elementary schools are focusing on 3rd through 5th grades. Primarily, this is to work out the kinks and give teachers time to develop greater mastery. We’ll eventually move to the primary grades, though (In fact, a first grade teacher approached me after school just yesterday with a specific project in mind for her kids.).

Because of the sheer number of student projects involved and the serious time required for printing on a single campus printer, we are implementing a staggered schedule for learning, designing, and printing. It works basically like this:

3d-printing-schedule

I am very interested in having classes create their own projects and purposes for 3D design and printing, and the details of that still must be sorted out. Will we require some sort of reservation? Will the printers travel (Most are on rolling carts), or will student projects have to come to them? Will the campus technology teacher print everything, or will the librarian or the classroom teacher be equipped to do so?

Down the line, our goals will evolve, as will our standard for these types of projects. Among the improvements  I will expect to see by the end of the year or beginning of next year:

  • Students in all elementary grades creating original 3D designs and projects.
  • Students create advanced, collaborative 3D projects (Think of different assembly lines creating one automobile.).
  • Student projects integrate other components, such as electronic lights, motors, sounds, Arduino computers, etc.
  • Create a 3D design competition fo elementary students.

I’rodriguez-3d-printing-studentll continue to periodically post updates as we move forward. If you have questions, please add them to the comments or shoot me an email. I’d appreciate the opportunity to connect!

Starting Early with Podcasting

I spent a great Sunday afternoon with my 7-year old daughter yesterday, and we finally got around to doing something she’s been wanting to do for awhile–setting up her own podcast. It’s called Reagan Reviews, and she plans on doing reviews of the many, many books she reads.  Book reviews, either audio or video, are a great way to introduce students to podcasting, and the subject matter is endless. The tools we used were an RCA Small Wonder video camera and Adobe Premiere Elements for the editing. We converted the .avi video file to .mpeg using the free Jodix video converter software, which I like for its ease of use–browse to the file and click convert. The host site she’ll be using for now is Podomatic, which offers 500 mb of storage, enough to get her going. Setting up a user account and uploading the podcast with this site were fast and easy, although certainly not easy enough for her to do without my help. I’m working on uploading the video to YouTube, and I’ll be sure to post it here when it’s ready.

(Note–I tried uploading to TeacherTube, but the site hung up in the final stages of the upload. This isn’t the first time this has happened for me. I love the site, and really hope they can invest in some server upgrades. In the meantime, it’s difficult for me to recommend to teachers that they use it for hosting their own videos. If this changes, I’ll be the first to spread the word.)

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