Tag: Maker Ed

Team 3D Design and Printing Challenges

Image source: https://3dprintingindustry.com/news/interview-dana-foster-3d-printing-education-18133/

3D printers have been the absolute rage in education and in maker spaces for a few years now.  While the printer itself is a magical and fascinating piece of science and technology, the price tag makes it imperative that we use the printers to engage students in activities that will help them grow more creative, adept at solving problems, and skilled at applying knowledge across the curriculum. In order to have a justifiable reason to pay $500, $900, $2000, or even more for a 3D printer, there needs to be a higher purpose, laser-focused on student learning. The following are just a few ideas that might stimulate your own, better plans to get kids engaged in design thinking and applying content knowledge as they work with design teams to create original 3D models.

  • All Together Now. Split class into teams who will design and print separate components of a single project. For example, teams might be producing the doors, roof, window, interior walls, or exterior walls of a model house. They might create components of a small toy, such as a car or action figure. The emphasis here is on effective communication between groups and precise calculations, as poorly planned or executed parts will not fit. This is very similar to actual manufacturing today, where components of the same object are often made on opposite sides of the globe.

    Not my favorite idea!!

  • A Better Mousetrap. Have students design a simple and effective humane mousetrap. Students will need to apply knowledge of biology and simple physics in order to lure, trap, and keep their quarry until it is relocated to a new home (Pro tip: Probably not a good idea to test by letting live mice loose in the classroom.)
  • Baby Shark Tank. Student teams design a simple, easily reproducible and customizable object to sell for a class fundraiser or to raise money for a charitable cause. Teams will pitch their idea to a committee of teachers, volunteers, or other students. Those chosen as best will be produced and sold for the designated cause. In addition to the technology and design skills being developed, through the planning and marketing of their idea, students will build math, speech, and writing skills.
  • Base-ic Math. Every math teacher has a set of base-10 blocks somewhere in their room. In this challenging activity, have students create blocks to represent different math systems, such as base-4, base-25, etc. This is a great way to really reinforce student understanding of a challenging math concept.
  • Even Better. Find an existing design and improve it. There are countless sites online where students can find and download free 3D designs. Have them use an existing design, such as a pencil holder, a drinking cup, or plastic toy, and work with their team to make it more practical, stronger, more aesthetically appealing, or just plain cooler. Daniel Pink’s chapter on Design in A Whole New Mind might be a good text to accompany this activity.
  • Now We’re Cookin’. Teams will design or re-engineer a utensil to perform a specific kitchen task. For example, students could create a stopper to keep opened canned soft drinks from losing their fizziness. They could create a chip bowl scoop that lets dining guests get chips without using their hands or without the frustration of using tongs (which just destroy the chips, am I right?). They could create a pepper corer that protects skin from jalapeño juice. Students could begin by interviewing parents, grandparents, or even professional cooks and asking what tasks frustrated them. They will get to practice effective communication, critical thinking, and creativity.
  • All Geared Up. Students will work together to create a machine that using no more than 4 gears to produce the highest gear ratio they can. In other words, turning 1 full turn of a gear produces as many turns as they can design of a final gear. This is the principle that makes one crank of a bicycle pedal spin  the back wheel several times. They could also try to turn their work into a useful object, such as an efficient fan, “motorized” toy, etc. This is a relatively easy to grasp challenge but has a lot of practical knowledge of simple machines and physics involved.

Hopefully, these are helpful as starting points for student design and will inspire you or your students to bigger and better applications. If you have ideas you would want to share, please include them in the comments, and I will put them into the post.

Matador Makerspaces Supplies

I wanted to share the shopping list for the new elementary makerspace carts, going into all of our elementary campuses in the next few weeks. After soliciting feedback from campus librarians (who will manage the carts as a part of the library inventory) and campus technology teachers, the list evolved from its original form to include more low- or no-tech tools, such as pipe cleaners and craft sticks, and less of the techie stuff I admittedly favor. I did manage to include a few, like MakeyMakeys, 3D pens, etc. You can view the entire list here.

Mystery Maker Bag Challenge — Supply List

In response to the overwhelming demand (Okay, 3 comments–w00t!), here are the supplies I included in each of the Mystery Maker Bags.

Mystery Maker Bag Challenge
World’s Slowest Marble Coaster
Using the materials in the bag, create a marble roller coaster that takes as long as possible to get from the top of a table to the floor. If yours takes longer than 15 seconds, you are an engineering genius!

Materials: paper of different sizes; paper towel or toilet tissue tubes; marble; tape; scissors

Mystery Maker Bag Challenge
Never Underestimate the Power of the Gumdrop
Using only gumdrops and toothpicks, create a structure that can hold a textbook at least 6 inches off the ground for at least 1 minute. Feeling confident? How about 12 inches? How about 2 textbooks?

Materials: bag of gumdrops; at least 100 toothpicks; standard-sized textbook

Mystery Maker Bag Challenge
Foiled Again!
Using only the piece of foil included, create a boat that will stay afloat with as many pennies as possible. How much treasure will your boat float? 10¢? 25¢? A dollar?

Materials: 10″ x 10″ square piece of aluminum foil; couple of dollars worth of pennies, kiddie pool or sink filled w/water

Mystery Maker Bag Challenge
One Small Step for Man…
Using the materials in the bag, paper rocket that will go as far on a breath as you possibly can. Feel free to customize the design. Does the shape affect the distance? Would adding extra features, like fins help?

Materials: paper; cardboard index cards; tape; soda straw; scissors

Mystery Maker Bag Challenge
Beware the Bridge to Nowhere!
Using the materials in the bag, create a platform that extends out as far as possible from the edge of a table or chair. The catch? There can be no supports or other parts of the platform touching the ground. If you’ve ever seen the Grand Canyon skywalk, you will get the basic idea!

Materials: newspaper; miscellaneous types/sizes paper; tape; cotton or nylon twine

Mystery Maker Bag Challenge
A Bridge over Troubled Waters
Using only straws and pins, build a bridge that can hold as much weight as possible without collapsing. To test the bridge, use the cup and add a few pennies at a time. Don’t look down!

Materials: standard soda straws; box or pincushion and straightpins

Mystery Maker Bag Challenge
Ping Pong Zip Along
Using the materials in your bag, create a way to transport a ping-pong ball safely to the end of a zip line. If the ping pong ball falls or gets stuck, it’s game, set, and match!

Materials: cotton/nylon string or dental floss; ping pong ball; tape; paper clips; index cards

Mystery Maker Bag Challenge
The Paper Elevator
Using nothing but paper and tape, create a structure that will hold a textbook at least 12 inches off the ground. Can you achieve this using the fewest pieces of paper necessary? How about TWO textbooks, smarty?

Materials: standard copier paper; clear tape; textbook

Mystery Maker Bag Challenge
Paper Helicopter
Using the materials inside your bag, create a helicopter that will fall to the ground as sloooooowly as possible. Make that landing as soft as possible!

Materials: copier paper; 2 index cards; scissors; tape; paperclip

Mystery Maker Bag Challenge
Launch Catapults!
Using the materials in the bag, create a catapult that can launch a pom-pom as far as you possibly can. Want an extra challenge? Try making the pom-pom hit a target or land in a specific place!

Materials: plastic cup, plastic spoons (2), rubber bands, pom-poms, craft sticks, index cards, scissors

Added this year:

Mystery Maker Bag Challenge
Don’t Break the Chain

Use the materials in your bag to create the longest chain you can that can support the weight of the included “cargo bag.”

Materials: construction paper, scissors, tape, cargo bags (zippered freezer bag with golf balls, coins, or other similar objects for mass, paperclip opened up and pushed through thick part of zipper for hanging onto chain)

Mystery Maker Bag Challenge
Tower of Power

Using only what is in the bag, create the tallest free-standing tower you can.

Materials: 20-25 sheets paper, tape

TIP: Schools throw out a LOT of printed-on paper. Instead of using blank paper in some of these projects, hit up the recycling bins and put the used to good re-use!

Grade Your Makers, Kill Your Makerspace

I read an article this  morning in Edutopia titled Creating an Authentic Maker Education Rubric by Lisa Yokana. The article has some very good suggestions for the types of things we might look for in students’ makerspace projects, specifically three very sound categories: process; understanding; and product. It is worth a read and has given me some useful ideas about posters or rubrics or group discussion guides I might want to include in the makerspaces I am planning for my own schools.

parkerOne sentence right up front in the article made me cringe, however. Ms. Yokana asks “How will we justify a grade to students and parents alike, especially to the student who ‘just isn’t good at art’?” This sentence really sidetracked me, and I almost stopped reading the rest of the piece, which does have some good, useful stuff. Ms. Yokana, in her Edutopia bio, mentions the need for a “change of paradigm” and states that the “present model is no longer valid.” Yet, bam! Right from the start, we are talking about…grades. Grades in a makerspace. Grades in a place that is about innovation, creativity, and imagination. Grades where kids engage in playful, curious experimentation and (if I can use the phrase without risking our district’s state rating) the joy of learning.

It probably should not surprise me, given the fact that I have seen teachers assign grades to anything and everything a kid does in the school. I have seen a kid’s average go up because she brought the box of tissues on the school supply list. Permission slip returned? A+!  Walking in a straight line? Extra credit!

I hate grades–okay, I’ve said it. Grades are mostly for the kids who have hacked the system, who know how to play the game. Grades are overblown, overused, and usually give very little or no insight into learning. Grades do not engage or motivate most students. A favorite quote, which I keep pinned to the top of my Twitter page, is from Alfie Kohn:

“Helping students forget about grades is the single best piece of advice for creating a learning-oriented classroom.”

Taken even further, getting rid of grades entirely would be an even better step. There are alternatives. My kids’ kindergarten and first grade teachers sent home detailed, qualitative reports that listed the performance standards my kids were meeting, on their way to meeting, or needing to learn. There was no number, no arbitrary and meaningless percentage. It was informative and helpful, and I doubt it caused an ounce of stress or apprehension for my kids, their classmates, or any parents. Kohn (1999) cites a series of studies by Bulter that demonstrated that the mere presence of number grades reduced students’ creative problem-solving, even if qualitative feedback was included.  Put simply, grades kill creativity and motivation.

Our illustrious 17th VP.

Our illustrious 17th VP.

I think assessment of student maker projects is a great idea that should be implemented. However, assessment should be for growth and generating new, better ideas, not for grades. It should be self- and peer-driven, to promote reflection and critical analysis. Makerspaces are intended to promote creativity, innovation, critical thinking, problem solving, collaboration, and a host of almost impossible to quantify character traits and skills. I can quickly tell if a kid knows the 17th vice president of the United States (Shuyler Colfax, of course). I find it a lot harder to assign a number to the ideas of a child or the worth of his/her creations.

I don’t want to sound like I am picking on Ms. Yokana. She shares some great ideas. Rubrics would be great tools for project assessment, certainly. Her 3 categories of assessment would be great areas to focus class discussions. How about using her basic ideas to create posters for the school makerspace something like these?

-POP

Is my product well-contructed-What design elements need improvement-Does it work as intended-Is my design easy to use-My point is that assessment is great and appropriate, but grades do more harm than good. Keep the grades out of your makerspaces, your genius hours, your coding clubs, etc. Let’s give the kids these precious few times to think and invent and tinker without fear or consequence.

 

Matador Innovators Camp Reflections

19868261593_ecd0711fe4_zThis summer marked the 3rd year of our summer technology and innovation camps. We conducted two Minecraft camps, two robotics camps, and two technology/innovation camps, called Matador Innovators. All of the camps were 4 days long and lasted 4 hours per day for older students (generally grades 4 and up) and 3 hours for younger students. Camps were staffed by district teachers, librarians, and students.

Last year, I supervised and facilitated the camps, but left it to my extremely capable teachers to run the day-to-day events. I missed the face-to-face interaction with the kids, so I decided to lead the Matador Innovators camps again this year, and I am so glad I did.

20495460031_ec74edc42e_zMatador Innovators camps are fairly informal. We spend the week trying out a variety of creative technology tools, with the students given lots of leeway to determine just how they should be used. The activities and technology tools used this year included:

  • MakeyMakeys — electronic project boards that let conductive objects become computer input devices.
  • Paper and tape — students challenge to construct free-standing tower using only masking tape and 20 sheets of paper.
  • Circuit Stickers — surface-mount LED lights that were crafted into a variety of paper/electronic creations.
  • Lego Movie Maker — wonderful, free app for creating stop-motion movies.
  • Scratch — free, online tool for learning programming concepts and creating movies, simulations, games, etc.20462960086_9ae970febc_z
  • Squishy Circuits — homemade conductive and insulating dough that was used with batteries and 9v batteries to create and explore electrical circuitry.
  • Brushbots — simple robots created from toothbrushes, coin batteries, and vibrating cellphone motors. Guaranteed giggles.

These were active, noisy, engaged20301155578_dbce834fff_z camps. Students shared ideas, offered suggestions, asked questions. For the most part, we tried to make the outcomes purposely vague, offering specific instructions or guidelines when students expressed a need for them or just to introduce a tool. For example, I walked the kids through the creation of electronic versions of Edvard Munch’s The Scream, which allowed campers to get familiar with Circuit Stickers. From there, they were limited only by their imaginations, and the results were quite varied: a mask; a car; lighthouses; a model video game controller.

20302528339_9c51b0b8c9_zStudents also had a great deal of autonomy when making stop-motion movies or learning to program with Scratch, leading to a diverse set of products. When we built the brushbots, students were given the challenge of creating a bot that could be steered in a particular direction. The brushbots were set loose on a makeshift racetrack to test students’ engineering ideas.

Here are four observations for the 2 weeks:

  1. Many kids actually need practice dealing with failure. They struggle with adapting their plans, testing new ideas. They are used to getting one shot to get it right, usually do, and consequently can get very frustrated when they are expected to overcome failures. I had to tell one student he could no longer say, “It doesn’t work” unless he immediately followed that with the word “yet.”
  2. 20489198965_077bb404d7_zStudents engaged in imaginative, hands-on experimentation are generally highly motivated, have few behavior issues, and actually have to be told to stop working.
  3. Kids’ imaginations are bigger than ours. A few might need us to provide specific rules or expectations for their products, but many more will exceed our own ideas when given the resources and the freedom to experiment.
  4. Maker classrooms must be flexible. Learning by making requires teachers to adapt to students’ needs and schedules on the fly. The open ended nature of the tasks lends to unpredictable timetables. Embrace the chaos.

All in all, it was an exhausting, extremely rewarding experience. It was amazing to get to spend so much time interacting with the students, the one thing I miss from my classroom days. I am already plotting next summer’s fun!

Maker Education Up to PARR?

I posted a new podcast today that outlines a rough idea I’ve been kicking around for standards for Maker projects in the classroom. The standards are identified as P.A.R.R., meaning Plan, Assemble, Reflect, and Repeat. It is something of a hyper-simplified spinoff of the engineering design process that is intended to help schools be sure that maker projects aren’t actually glorified arts and crafts.  Take a listen for more information, if you have a few minutes, and let me know if it makes sense or is just out there.

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